Friday, April 2, 2021

Cowboy chic ‘FUNITURE’ by Lure of the Dim Trails (1989-2002)

 


It has been nearly 20 years since I crafted the last piece of my Cowboy Chic 'FUNITURE,' but I still hear from old friends and customers from time to time, so I thought I’d give you one last look at my art…


Cowboy Chic -- Lure of the Dim Trails

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/11/cowboy-folk-art-lure-of-dim-trails.html


My cowboy folk art

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/10/my-cowboy-folk-art.html


Cowboy Chic Chairs -- Come sit a spell

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/11/cowboy-chic-come-sit-spell.html


Cowboy Chic Beds -- Headboards make a good canvas

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/11/cowboy-chic-headboards-make-good-canvas.html


Cowboy Chic Desks -- Letters from a cowboy's desk

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/11/cowboy-chic-letters-from-cowboys-desk.html


Cowboy Chic Mirrors -- Chip-carved mirrors and hat racks

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/12/cowboy-chic-chip-carved-mirrors-and-hat.html


Cowboy Chic Chests -- Blanket chests and toy boxes

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/12/cowboy-chic-blanket-chests-and-toy.html


Cowboy Chic Misc. -- Lure of the Dim Trails Odds 'n Ends

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2011/12/cowboy-chic-lure-of-dim-trails-odds-n.html


Cowboy Chic Dressers -- Rancho deluxe dressers and nightstands

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2012/01/cowboy-chic-rancho-deluxe-dressers-and.html


Cowboy Chic Decor -- Saddles and bridles for decoration

http://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2012/01/cowboy-chic-saddles-and-bridles-for.html


Before you leave check out my cowboy folk art video... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fAQQBNwyig4


Happy Trails

Thursday, March 11, 2021

COGGESHALL — FROM JOLLY OL’ ENGLAND TO WILD WEST MONTANA

 


JOHN COGGESHALL (1599–1647) OUR 10TH GREAT-GRANDFATHER

BIRTH 2 DEC 1599 • Halstead, Essex, England

DEATH 27 NOV 1647 • Newport, Newport, Rhode Island, United States


JOHN COGGESHALL SR. (DECEMBER 2, 1599 – NOVEMBER 27, 1647) WAS ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS AND THE FIRST PRESIDENT OF ALL FOUR TOWNS IN THE COLONY. He was a successful silk merchant in Essex, England, but he emigrated to the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1632 and quickly assumed a number of roles in the colonial government. In the mid-1630s, he became a supporter of dissident minister John Wheelwright and of Anne Hutchinson. Hutchinson was tried as a heretic in 1637, and Coggeshall was one of three deputies who voted for her acquittal. She was banished from the colony in 1638, and the three deputies who voted for her acquittal were also compelled to leave. 


Before leaving Boston, Coggeshall and many other Hutchinson supporters signed the Portsmouth Compact in March 1638 agreeing to form a government based on the individual consent of the inhabitants. They then established the settlement of Portsmouth on Aquidneck Island (called Rhode Island at the time), one of the four towns comprising the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.



Coggeshall was very active in civil affairs, but a rift in the leadership of the colony caused him and several other leaders to leave in 1639, moving to the south end of the island and establishing the town of Newport. The towns of Portsmouth and Newport reunited in 1640 under the leadership of William Coddington, and Coggeshall was his assistant until 1647 when the two towns on Rhode Island united to form a common government with the towns of Providence and Warwick, and Coggeshall was elected President of the entire Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. His tenure was very short due to his death later the same year, but during his administration many laws were established which became the basis for the colony and the future State of Rhode Island.


LINEAGE:


John Coggeshall 1599-1647 -- 10th great-grandfather


Joshua Coggeshall 1623-1689 -- Son of John Coggeshall


Mary Coggeshall 1662-1699 -- Daughter of Joshua Coggeshall


Mary Bull 1693-1741 -- Daughter of Mary Coggeshall


Content Mumford 1725-1790 -- Daughter of Mary Bull


William Braman 1753-1804 -- Son of Content Mumford


Waterman F Brayman 1786-1865 -- Son of William Braman


Elvira W. Brayman 1822-1909 -- Daughter of Waterman F Brayman


Marcus M Pierce 1842-1882 -- Son of Elvira W. Brayman


Lillian Amanda Pierce 1867-1957 -- Daughter of Marcus M Pierce — great-grandmother



Yours truly at the Cody Old West Show, 1989

AN INTERESTING AND EXCITING FIND FOR AN OLD COWBOY



YOU MAY NOT KNOW THAT I BOUGHT, SOLD, AND TRADED OLD WEST ANTIQUES FOR ABOUT 30 YEARS. 


OVER THE YEARS I HAD BOTH FURSTNOW AND MILES CITY SADDLES IN MY COLLECTION, SO THIS GENEALOGY DISCOVERY IS PRETTY NEAT:


CHARLES ETHERIDGE COGGESHALL (1869–1913) OUR 5TH COUSIN 5X REMOVED
BIRTH 23 FEB 1869 • St. Croix, Wisconsin
DEATH AFT. 1913 • Miles City, Custer, Montana, USA


Watch fob (front) from author's collection

Watch fob (reverse) from author's collection


MONTANA SADDLE MAKERS: FURSTNOW, COGGSHALL AND MILES CITY SADDLERY


Al Furstnow, learned the saddlery business from his father. At age 19, he worked for Collins in Cheyenne in 1881. He worked in Miles City for Goettlich for about a year starting in 1883 and then for Collins in Omaha in 1884. He bounced around to Cheyenne and San Francisco and then came to work in Miles City for Robbins and Lenoir in 1894. In August, he opened Furstnow’s Saddle Shop with himself as the sole employee. In December, his shop got a boost in capital and another able business mind when Charlie Coggshall bought a half interest.


Charles E. Coggshall, who had been ranching with his father, disposed of his livestock and in December of 1896, they bought out the stock of Moran and W.J. Zimmerman, whom Moran had taken on as a partner in an attempt to stay in business. Furstnow and Coggshall added workers and became the only major saddlery between Billings and Dickinson, ND. In 1899, Furstnow and Coggshall split up, forming a rivalry that lasted well into the 20th Century.


Charles E. Coggshall was a strict taskmaster from the old school of hard work and incredible quality. He had the amazing ability to employ the best craftsmen anywhere. Although Charles himself was not a saddlemaker, his years of experience as an avid horseman enabled him to recognize the virtues of a good saddle. Improvements and changes were constantly being made over the years. Under his guidance, the Montana Saddle Tree was perfected. He was also responsible for improvements including the swell fork and flat-plate rigging. But what he and Furstnow are both credited with is making thousands and thousands of saddles.

In a highly successful effort to help fill the world’s need for saddles, the firms started by Al Furstnow and Charlie Coggshall blended assembly line techniques from back East with custom care exercised by the one-man shops of the West. The two large local saddleries employed dozens of men who came to specialize in various aspects of making this most necessary of cowboy tools. Some saddlemakers made four to six saddles per week and some stayed in the business long enough to make 2,000 to 3,000 saddles.


In 1909, things started happening in the local saddle business. Coggshall employee Clem Kathmann, along with Frank Jelinek and Bert Coleman, bought out Coggshall and formed the Miles City Saddlery Co. In 1910, Al Moreno, a highly talented stamper from California joined Furstnow in his new building. Furstnow was turning out about 800 saddles per year at that point. Both saddleries steadily built their businesses up to a peak in the late teens.


In 1916, the Miles City Saddlery made 1,937 saddles. At the outbreak of World War I, two dozen men were employed in the shop. Between 1910 and the Depression years of the ‘30s there were as many as 40 saddlemakers working in Miles City.


LINEAGE:


Charles Etheridge Coggeshall 1869-1913 -- 5th cousin 5x removed

Eri Coggeshall 1830-1901 -- Father of Charles Etheridge Coggeshall

Frederick Coggeshall 1795-1863 -- Father of Eri Coggeshall

Dunlap Coggeshall 1747-1808 -- Father of Frederick Coggeshall

Benjamin Coggeshall 1712-1781 -- Father of Dunlap Coggeshall

John Coggeshall 1659-1727 -- Father of Benjamin Coggeshall

Joshua Coggeshall 1623-1689 -- Father of John Coggeshall

Mary Coggeshall 1662-1699 -- Daughter of Joshua Coggeshall

Mary Bull 1693-1741 -- Daughter of Mary Coggeshall

Content Mumford 1725-1790 -- Daughter of Mary Bull

William Braman 1753-1804 -- Son of Content Mumford

Waterman F Brayman 1786-1865 -- Son of William Braman

Elvira W. Brayman (Braman) 1822-1909 -- Daughter of Waterman F Brayman

Marcus M Pierce 1842-1882 -- Son of Elvira W. Brayman (Braman)

Lillian Amanda Pierce 1867-1957 -- Daughter of Marcus M Pierce — great-grandmother


Monday, March 8, 2021

A WEE BIT OF SCOTTISH RELIGIOUS HISTORY


SCOTTISH COVENANTERS WERE MEMBERS OF A 17TH-CENTURY SCOTTISH RELIGIOUS AND POLITICAL MOVEMENT, who supported a Presbyterian Church of Scotland, and the primacy of its leaders in religious affairs. The name derived from Covenant, a biblical term for a bond or agreement with God.

The origins of the movement lay in disputes with King James VI & I, and his son Charles I of England over church structure and doctrine. In 1638, thousands of Scots signed the National Covenant, pledging to resist changes imposed by Charles on the kirk (church); following victory in the 1639 and 1640 Bishops' Wars, the Covenanters took control of Scotland.


The 1643 Solemn League and Covenant brought them into the First English Civil War on the side of Parliament, but they supported Charles in the 1648 Second English Civil War. After his execution in 1649, the Covenanter government agreed to restore his son Charles II to the English throne; defeat in the 1651 Third English Civil War led to Scotland's incorporation into the Commonwealth of England.


AFTER THE 1660 RESTORATION, THE COVENANTERS LOST CONTROL OF THE KIRK AND BECAME A PERSECUTED MINORITY, LEADING TO SEVERAL ARMED REBELLIONS AND A PERIOD FROM 1679 TO 1688 KNOWN AS "THE KILLING TIME". 


Following the 1688 Glorious Revolution in Scotland, the Church of Scotland was re-established as a wholly Presbyterian structure and most Covenanters readmitted. This marked the end of their existence as a significant movement, although dissident minorities persisted in Scotland, Ireland, and North America.


JAMES URQUHART -- OUR 9TH GREAT-GRANDFATHER -- WAS A WELL KNOWN COVENANTER


The first minister of the new parish of Kinloss was called in 1657, but (in these unsettled times) was not ordained until 1659. 


His name was James Urquhart and his stipend was fixed at £20 a year and “4 chalders of beer”. James Urquhart was a well known Covenanter, who stoutly resisted the reintroduction of Episcopacy, and in 1663 he was deposed for “refusing to submit to the new Government in Church and State.” 


Undaunted, James Urquhart continued his ministry, holding conventicles in the fields, and for some years courageously defied attempts on the part of the Earl of Moray to silence him. 



Eventually, however, he was seized, condemned by the Privy Council to be banished, and was CONFINED IN 1685 IN BLACKNESS CASTLE where so many noted Covenanters were imprisoned for their faith. 


In 1690, on the restoration of Presbyterianism, he was restored to his charge.


RELIGIOUS FREEDOM IN THE AMERICAN COLONIES


John Urquhart of Newhall (1658-1731), our 8th great-grandfather, and a Scottish immigrant to the Colonies, was the son of James Urquhart Minister, Covenanter in Moray and Ross.


ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN... 


THE RIGHT REVEREND ANDREW BOYD BISHOP OF ARGYLL (1566–1636), OUR 12TH GREAT-GRANDFATHER


Andrew Boyd, Bishop of Argyll (c. 1566 – 22 December 1636) was a Scottish bishop. He was the natural son of Thomas Boyd, 6th Lord Boyd (see Scots Peerage vol V, p. 167. M.A. Glasgow 1584).


Boyd was the parson of Eaglesham, and was preferred to the see (diocese) of Argyll, as their Bishop, in the year 1613. He was recorded as "a good man, and did much good in his diocese, where he always resided.


He married Elizabeth Conyngham, daughter of Adam, of Auchenharvie [Fasti vol VIII, p. 332]. They had six sons and one daughter.


Boyd died on 22 December 1636. He is interred in the graveyard of the High Kirk, Dunoon, Scotland.



JOHN GUTHRIE (11TH LAIRD OF GUTHRIE) BISHOP OF MORAY (1573–1649) OUR 11TH GREAT-GRANDFATHER


John Guthrie (died 28 August 1649) was a Scottish prelate active in the first half of the 17th century. The son of the goldsmith Patrick Guthrie and Margaret née Rait, in 1597 he completed an MA at the University of St Andrews, becoming a Reader at the church of Arbroath in the same year. Two years later, on 27 August 1599, he became minister of Kinnell parish church in Angus (Presbytery of Arbroath). In the following years he was translated to various churches. In 1603, he became minister of Arbirlot parish, Angus. In 1617, he became minister in the city of Perth, before, on 15 June 1621, becoming minister of the parish of St Giles in Edinburgh.


Guthrie used his appointments as a platform for involvement in the national church. As minister of Arbirlot, he was one of the commissioners of the Presbytery of Arbroath at the Glasgow assembly of 1610. Later in that year, he got elected as clerk of the synod of St Andrews. He was a member and commissioner of the Perth assembly in 1618. In this period he established himself as an ardent supporter of the crown and its episcopalian policies. It was this that brought him the prestigious and important charge of St Giles in 1621. It was no surprise that, only two years later, he rose to episcopal rank, obtaining crown nomination to the vacant diocese of Moray on 21 July 1623. He was provided to the see on 16 August of the same year, and received consecration in October.


As Bishop of Moray, Guthrie remained a staunch royalist, an active anti-Catholic and keen promoter of ecclesiastical discipline. He took a large role in the Scottish coronation of King Charles I in 1633. Bishop Guthrie supported the King's plans to bring the Scottish church in line with the Church of England, authorising all ministers in Moray to obtain and use the new Scottish Book of Common Prayer. Bishop Guthrie was, however, out of touch with general religious sentiment in Scotland, and the Glasgow assembly of Scottish churchmen deposed him from his bishopric on 11 December 1638. Guthrie refused to accept this deposition and refused to recognise the legality of the National Covenant. He preached against it into the Spring of 1639 and on 11 July 1639 he was excommunicated by the Scottish church. He attempted to hold out in Spynie Palace. On 16 July 1640, Major-General Robert Monro of Foulis captured the palace. Guthrie was sent to Edinburgh and imprisoned in the city's Tolbooth.


He was later released, and retired to his estate, purchased in 1636, at Guthrie, Angus. John died at Guthrie on 28 August 1649 and was buried at the Guthrie Collegiate Aisle, the local parish church. He had married one Nichola Wood, by whom he had three sons (John, Patrick, and Andrew) and three daughters (Bethia, Nicolas, and Lucretia). His oldest son John (d. 1643) followed his father into the ministry, while his youngest son Andrew fought as a royalist during the English Civil War, being captured at the Battle of Philiphaugh (1645) and executed soon after.


Source above: Wikipedia


Wednesday, February 10, 2021

GREAT-GRANDDAD WAS AN OUTLAW WITH A BOUNTY OF 50 GOLD PIECES ON HIS HEAD


 Well, at least that’s the way Hollywood presents his story… SEE: 'OUTLAW KING' (Official Netflix Trailer), THE STORY OF ROBERT THE BRUCE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-G1BME8FKw


I’m well into my 3rd decade of studying my family history (genealogy).


Like everything else in 2020 my genealogy gave me a huge surprise. This one came when ancestry (dot) com revised my ethnicity status to nearly 50% Scottish. 


Just a dozen years ago I discovered a couple hundred French-Canadian ancestors that came to New France between 1635 and 1755, and were involved in the “Fur Trade.” 


Those discoveries kept me busy for a decade studying and writing about the Canadian Fur Trade. SEE: http://laprairie-voyageur-canoes.blogspot.com/2017/10/ripples-from-la-prairie-voyageur-canoes.html


Back to the subject at hand… MY SCOTTISH HERITAGE 


For the past few months I’ve spent roughly forty hours a week ferreting out new Scottish ancestors.


See my extraordinary results here: https://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2021/01/my-scottish-roots-became-even-deeper-in.html


This week I made the most exciting discovery yet… ROBERT "THE BRUCE,” KING OF SCOTLAND, is my 20th great-grandfather.

Robert I (11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), popularly known as Robert the Bruce (Medieval Gaelic: Roibert a Briuis; Modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Brus; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; Early Scots: Robert Brus; Latin: Robertus Brussius), was King of Scots from 1306 to his death in 1329. Robert was one of the most famous warriors of his generation and eventually led Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence against England. He fought successfully during his reign to regain Scotland's place as an independent country and is now revered in Scotland as a national hero.

His paternal fourth great-grandfather was King David I. Robert's grandfather, Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, was one of the claimants to the Scottish throne during the "Great Cause". As Earl of Carrick, Robert the Bruce supported his family's claim to the Scottish throne and took part in William Wallace's revolt against Edward I of England. Appointed in 1298 as a Guardian of Scotland alongside his chief rival for the throne, John Comyn of Badenoch, and William Lamberton, Bishop of St Andrews, Robert resigned in 1300 because of his quarrels with Comyn and the apparently imminent restoration of John Balliol to the Scottish throne. After submitting to Edward I in 1302 and returning to "the king's peace," Robert inherited his family's claim to the Scottish throne upon his father's death.

In February 1306, Bruce, having wounded Comyn, rushed from the church where they had met and encountered his attendants outside. He told them what had happened and said, "I must be off, for I doubt I have slain the Red Comyn." "Doubt?" Roger de Kirkpatrick of Closeburn answered. "I mak sikker" ("I'll make sure," or "I make sure"). Kirkpatrick then rushed into the church and killed Comyn. For this, Bruce was then excommunicated by Pope Clement V (although he received absolution from Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow). Bruce moved quickly to seize the throne, and was crowned king of Scots on 25 March 1306. Edward I's forces defeated Robert in the battle of Methven, forcing him to flee into hiding before re-emerging in 1307 to defeat an English army at Loudoun Hill and wage a highly successful guerrilla war against the English. 

Bruce defeated his other Scots enemies, destroying their strongholds and devastating their lands, and in 1309 held his first parliament. A series of military victories between 1310 and 1314 won him control of much of Scotland, and at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, Robert defeated a much larger English army under Edward II of England, confirming the re-establishment of an independent Scottish kingdom. The battle marked a significant turning point, with Robert's armies now free to launch devastating raids throughout northern England, while also extending his war against the English to Ireland by sending an army to invade there and by appealing to the Irish to rise against Edward II's rule.

Despite Bannockburn and the capture of the final English stronghold at Berwick in 1318, Edward II refused to renounce his claim to the overlordship of Scotland. In 1320, the Scottish nobility submitted the Declaration of Arbroath to Pope John XXII, declaring Robert as their rightful monarch and asserting Scotland's status as an independent kingdom. 

In 1324, the Pope recognised Robert I as king of an independent Scotland, and in 1326, the Franco-Scottish alliance was renewed in the Treaty of Corbeil. In 1327, the English deposed Edward II in favour of his son, Edward III, and peace was concluded between Scotland and England with the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton in 1328, by which Edward III renounced all claims to sovereignty over Scotland.

Robert died in June 1329. His body is buried in Dunfermline Abbey, while his heart was interred in Melrose Abbey and his internal organs embalmed and placed in St Serf's Chapel, Dumbarton, site of the medieval Cardross Parish church.


Source: (above) Wikipedia

LINEAGE:

Robert "The Bruce" King of Scotland 1274-1329 — 20th great-grandfather

Marjorie Bruce 1297-1316 — Daughter of Robert "The Bruce" King of Scotland

Robert II Stewart King of Scotland 1316-1390 — Son of Marjorie Bruce

Margaret Stewart Princess of Scots 1342-1410 — Daughter of Robert II Stewart King of Scotland

Lord Donald MacDonald Of Islay, of the Isles & Harlaw 1359-1423 — Son of Margaret Stewart Princess of Scots

Earl Alexander MacDonald Of the Isles & Ross -1449 — Son of Lord Donald MacDonald Of Islay, of the Isles & Harlaw

Hugh MacDonald 1st of Sleat -1498 — Son of Earl Alexander MacDonald Of the Isles & Ross

Donald Gallach MacDonald 3rd of Sleat -1506 — Son of Hugh MacDonald 1st of Sleat

Donald Grumach MacDonald 4th Baron of Sleat 1480-1534 — Son of Donald Gallach MacDonald 3rd of Sleat

Donald Gorm MacDonald 5th of Sleat 1500-1539 — Son of Donald Grumach MacDonald 4th Baron of Sleat

Donald Gormson MacDonald Of Sleat 1522-1575 — Son of Donald Gorm MacDonald 5th of Sleat

Archibald Cleirich Macdonald of Sleat 1552-1617 — Son of Donald Gormson MacDonald Of Sleat

Sir Donald Gorm Og MacDonald 1st Baronet of Sleat 1575-1643 — Son of Archibald Cleirich Macdonald of Sleat

Donald MacDonald 1st of Castleton 1624-1690 — Son of Sir Donald Gorm Og MacDonald 1st Baronet of Sleat

John MacDonald 2nd of castleton 1661-1755 — Son of Donald MacDonald 1st of Castleton

Donald MacDonald 3rd of Castleton 1712-1768 — Son of John MacDonald 2nd of castleton

John McDonald 1739-1826 — Son of Donald MacDonald 3rd of Castleton

John McDonald II 1775-1826 — Son of John McDonald

Angus McDonald 1810-1887 — Son of John McDonald II

Margaret McDonald 1832-1881 — Daughter of Angus McDonald

Allen McNeill 1865-1927 — Son of Margaret McDonald

Annie Margaret McNeill 1892-1964 — Daughter of Allen McNeill — grandmother


UPDATE...


Robert's ancestors came to Great Britain from Normandy, France with William the Conqueror in 1066


LINEAGE:


Robert de Brusse (came to England with William the Conqueror in 1066) 1036-1094 -- 29th great-grandfather




Adam de Brus -1094-- Son of Robert de Brusse

Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale 1070-1141 -- Son of Adam de Brus




Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale 1138-1194 -- Son of Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale




William de Brus 3rd Lord of Annandale -1212 -- Son of Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale 1195-1226 -- Son of William de Brus 3rd Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale 1215-1295 -- Son of Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 6th Lord of Annandale 1243-1304 -- Son of Robert de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale




Robert I "The Bruce" King of Scotland 1274-1329 -- Son of Robert de Brus 6th Lord of Annandale




Wednesday, January 13, 2021

My Scottish Roots Became Even Deeper in 2020

 Download map to see full size

For the past decade I had focused my Family History research on my French-Canadian Ancestors, and their involvement in the the fur trade between 1625 and 1850.


SEE: http://laprairie-voyageur-canoes.blogspot.com/2017/10/ripples-from-la-prairie-voyageur-canoes.html


THEN IN THE FALL OF 2020, ANCESTRY (DOT COM) REVISED MY ETHNICITY ESTIMATE SO THAT SCOTLAND BECAME A SEPARATE REGION AND NOW ACCOUNTS FOR 47+% OF MY DNA MAKEUP.


Armed with that new information I decided to take a deeper dive into my family tree.


I concentrated on the following Scottish Surnames already in my tree: 


Abernethy (m), Austine (d) (sept) [Branch of Keith], Baillie (m), Barlow (m), Bell (d), Boyd (m), Brodie (m), Brolachan or O'Brolachan from Kintyre (also Bradley) (d), Broun [Brown] (d) (m), Bruce (m), Cameron (d), Campbell (m) (d), Colquhoun (m), Cunningham [Conyngham] (m), Denniston (m), Douglas (m), Drummond (m), Dunbar (m), Elphinstone (m), Erskine (m), Fleming (m), Forbes (m), Fraser (m), Galbraith [Galbreath] (d), Graham (m), Grant (m), Guthrie (m), Hay (m), Hamilton (m), Hepburn (m), Innes (m), Johnstone (d), Lamont (assoc. Munn) (d), Livingstone (d), Lockhart [Lockart] (d), Lyle (m), MacDonald (McDonald) (m), MacDonald of Sleat (d), MacEachern (d), MacIntyre (d), McIsaac (d), MacKenzie (m), MacLean (d) [aka McClean] (d), Maclachlan (d), MacLeod (d), MacLean (m), (McCleod) (m), MacMichael [became Mitchell] (d), MacMillan (d), MacNeill of Colonsay (d), Maxwell (m), Mowat (m), Munn (assoc. Clan Lamont) (d), Munro (m), Murray (d), Ogilvie (m), Raitt (m), Paterson (m), Ramsay (m), Robert (m), Robertson (m), Shaw (m), Sinclair (m), Somerville (m), Stewart (m), Sutherland (m), Urquhart (m), Wallace (m) and Wilkie (d) (sept) [Branch of MacDonald] * Mom’s lineage = (m) & * Dad’s lineage = (d)



MY 2020, ETHNICITY ESTIMATE (SCOTLAND 47%)


Primarily located in: Scotland, Northern Ireland & Brittany France. My ethnicity estimate is 47%, but it can range from 42—61%. 


With its center in the northern third of the island of Great Britain but stretching down to Brittany in France, our Scotland ethnicity region is known for its geographical beauty, medieval architecture, and folklore. Gaelic and Scots have influenced regional English dialects and are both still spoken in some areas. National symbols, including the Lion Rampant, clan tartans, and bagpipes, are often recognized internationally alongside symbols of traditional cuisine, like whiskey and haggis.


Back in 2011, I ordered both maternal lineage (MtDNA) and paternal lineage (Y-46) DNA tests from ancestry (dot com).  


The results of those early tests suggested mom's ancient ancestors may have migrated to Europe settling in present-day Basque Country and other parts of Europe, and dad's ancient ancestors probably lived in present day Scandinavia.


MY 2013, ETHNICITY ESTIMATE 100% EUROPEAN


This estimate suggested my ethnicity is 100% European broken down as follows: 53% Western European, 21% Irish, 20% English and Scotch with trace amounts 4% from the Iberian Peninsula and 2% from Scandinavia.




I FOUND A THOUSAND YEARS OF ROYAL SCOTS ANCESTRY:



• Fergus Mór mac Eirc 1st king of Dál Riata 430-501

46th great-grandfather



• Kenneth I MacAlpin King of the Picts 810-858

34th great-grandfather


• Constantine I (Constantín mac Cináeda) King of the Picts 862-877

33rd great-grandfather


• Donald II King of Scots (Alba) 889-900

32nd great-grandfather


• Malcolm I King of Scots (Alba) 943-954

31st great-grandfather


• Kenneth II (Coinneach mac Mhaoil Chaluim) King of Scots (Alba) 971-995

30th great-grandfather


• Malcolm II King of the Scots 954-1034

29th great-grandfather


• Duncan I King Of Scotland 1001-1040

27th great-grandfather

+

• Suthen (Aelflaed, Sybilla, Sibyl) Fitzsiward Queen Of Scotland 1014-1040

27th great-grandmother

+

• Macbeth King of Scotland 1014-1057

husband of 27th great-grandmother



Fergus de Galloway King, 1st Lord of Galloway 1096-1161

27th great-grandfather


• King Malcolm III Longneck of Scotland Caennmor 1031-1093

26th great-grandfather

+

• Saint Margaret Atheling of Wessex Queen of Scotland 1045-1093

26th great-grandmother



• Matilda Dunkeld Good Queen Maud of Scotland 1080-1118

26th great-grandmother


• David I King of Scotland 1084-1153

25th great-grandfather


• Edgar King of Scotland 1074-1107

25th great-granduncle


• Alexander I King of Scotland 1078-1124

25th great-granduncle


Alan fitzRoland Lord of Galloway, Constable of Scotland 1175-1234

24th great-grandfather


• Sir William Wallace of Elderslie 1272-1305

21st great-grandfather



• Robert I "The Bruce" King of Scotland 1274-1329

20th great-grandfather


• Sir James 'the Good' & 'Black Douglas' Douglas (supporter of Robert the Bruce) 1286-1330

19th great-grandfather


• Robert II Stewart King of Scotland 1316-1390

18th great-grandfather


• Robert III King of Scotland 1337-1406

17th great-granduncle


• Henry I Sinclair (St. Clair) Earl of Orkney, Lord of Roslin 1345-1400

17th great-grandfather



• James Stewart Black Knight of Lorne 1383-1451

16th great-grandfather

+

• Joan Beaufort Queen of Scots 1406-1445

16th great-grandmother


• James II Stewart King of Scotland 1430-1460

16th great-grandfather


• James III Stewart King of Scotland 1451-1488

15th great-grandfather

+

• Margaret of Denmark, Queen of Scotland 1456-1486

15th great-grandmother


• James IV Stewart King of Scotland 1473-1513

14th great-grandfather


• James V Stewart King of Scotland 1512-1542

13th great-granduncle


• James Hepburn Duke of Orkney, Earl of Bothwell 1536-1578

12th great-granduncle

+



• Mary Stuart Queen of Scots 1542-1587

wife of 12th great-granduncle


• Sir Robert Boyd 1st Lord of Kilmarnock 1420-1482

17th great-grandfather


Agreement signed by Mary Queen of Scots, confirming arrangements made 

with Queen Elizabeth for her, by (5th) Lord Boyd and others – 9 February 1569



• SOMERLED MAC GILLEBRIDE KING OF THE ISLES

23rd great-grandfather (dad's side of family tree)

25th great-grandfather (mom's side of family tree)


We are descended from two 1/2 Brothers, Sons of Lord John MacDonald of Islay, Lord of the Isles who was Somerled's 3rd great-grandson.


Our earliest lineage looks like this:

• SOMERLED MAC GILLEBRIDE KING OF THE ISLES 1100-1164 -- 23RD GREAT-GRANDFATHER

• KING RAGNALL (RANALD) MAC SOMHAIRLE (MACSORLEY) OF THE ISLES 1141-1207 -- Son of Somerled Mac Gillebride King of the Isles

• DONALD "EPONYMOUS" MACRANALD OF THE ISLES 1190-1269 -- Son of King Ragnall (Ranald) mac Somhairle (MacSorley) of the Isles

• LORD ANGUS MOR MACDONALD OF ISLAY 1249-1293 -- Son of Donald "Eponymous" MacRanald of the Isles

• LORD ANGUS OG MACDONALD OF THE ISLES 1272-1324 -- Son of Lord Angus Mor MacDonald of Islay

• LORD JOHN MACDONALD OF ISLAY, LORD OF THE ISLES 1326-1386 -- Son of Lord Angus Og MacDonald of the Isles
.

Our tree branches out here with two 1/2 Brothers, Sons of Lord John MacDonald of Islay, Lord of the Isles:


[DAD'S LINE BEGINS] 

LORD DONALD MACDONALD OF HARLAW, LORD OF THE ISLES –1423 -- 17th great-grandfather

AND


[MOM'S LINE BEGINS] 

RANALD MACDONALD 1ST OF CLANRANALD & GLENGARRY 1352–1386 -- 19th great-grandfather



EARLIER 2014 SCOTLAND DNA NOTES FROM MY BLOG:


Saturday, September 6, 2014

DNA Links Grandma To Scotland

https://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2014/09/dna-links-grandma-to-scotland.html


Sunday, March 9, 2014

Was Great Granddad A Viking King?

https://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2014/03/was-great-granddad-viking-king.html