Wednesday, February 10, 2021

GREAT-GRANDDAD WAS AN OUTLAW WITH A BOUNTY OF 50 GOLD PIECES ON HIS HEAD


 Well, at least that’s the way Hollywood presents his story… SEE: 'OUTLAW KING' (Official Netflix Trailer), THE STORY OF ROBERT THE BRUCE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-G1BME8FKw


I’m well into my 3rd decade of studying my family history (genealogy).


Like everything else in 2020 my genealogy gave me a huge surprise. This one came when ancestry (dot) com revised my ethnicity status to nearly 50% Scottish. 


Just a dozen years ago I discovered a couple hundred French-Canadian ancestors that came to New France between 1635 and 1755, and were involved in the “Fur Trade.” 


Those discoveries kept me busy for a decade studying and writing about the Canadian Fur Trade. SEE: http://laprairie-voyageur-canoes.blogspot.com/2017/10/ripples-from-la-prairie-voyageur-canoes.html


Back to the subject at hand… MY SCOTTISH HERITAGE 


For the past few months I’ve spent roughly forty hours a week ferreting out new Scottish ancestors.


See my extraordinary results here: https://a-drifting-cowboy.blogspot.com/2021/01/my-scottish-roots-became-even-deeper-in.html


This week I made the most exciting discovery yet… ROBERT "THE BRUCE,” KING OF SCOTLAND, is my 20th great-grandfather.

Robert I (11 July 1274 – 7 June 1329), popularly known as Robert the Bruce (Medieval Gaelic: Roibert a Briuis; Modern Scottish Gaelic: Raibeart Brus; Norman French: Robert de Brus or Robert de Bruys; Early Scots: Robert Brus; Latin: Robertus Brussius), was King of Scots from 1306 to his death in 1329. Robert was one of the most famous warriors of his generation and eventually led Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence against England. He fought successfully during his reign to regain Scotland's place as an independent country and is now revered in Scotland as a national hero.

His paternal fourth great-grandfather was King David I. Robert's grandfather, Robert de Brus, 5th Lord of Annandale, was one of the claimants to the Scottish throne during the "Great Cause". As Earl of Carrick, Robert the Bruce supported his family's claim to the Scottish throne and took part in William Wallace's revolt against Edward I of England. Appointed in 1298 as a Guardian of Scotland alongside his chief rival for the throne, John Comyn of Badenoch, and William Lamberton, Bishop of St Andrews, Robert resigned in 1300 because of his quarrels with Comyn and the apparently imminent restoration of John Balliol to the Scottish throne. After submitting to Edward I in 1302 and returning to "the king's peace," Robert inherited his family's claim to the Scottish throne upon his father's death.

In February 1306, Bruce, having wounded Comyn, rushed from the church where they had met and encountered his attendants outside. He told them what had happened and said, "I must be off, for I doubt I have slain the Red Comyn." "Doubt?" Roger de Kirkpatrick of Closeburn answered. "I mak sikker" ("I'll make sure," or "I make sure"). Kirkpatrick then rushed into the church and killed Comyn. For this, Bruce was then excommunicated by Pope Clement V (although he received absolution from Robert Wishart, Bishop of Glasgow). Bruce moved quickly to seize the throne, and was crowned king of Scots on 25 March 1306. Edward I's forces defeated Robert in the battle of Methven, forcing him to flee into hiding before re-emerging in 1307 to defeat an English army at Loudoun Hill and wage a highly successful guerrilla war against the English. 

Bruce defeated his other Scots enemies, destroying their strongholds and devastating their lands, and in 1309 held his first parliament. A series of military victories between 1310 and 1314 won him control of much of Scotland, and at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314, Robert defeated a much larger English army under Edward II of England, confirming the re-establishment of an independent Scottish kingdom. The battle marked a significant turning point, with Robert's armies now free to launch devastating raids throughout northern England, while also extending his war against the English to Ireland by sending an army to invade there and by appealing to the Irish to rise against Edward II's rule.

Despite Bannockburn and the capture of the final English stronghold at Berwick in 1318, Edward II refused to renounce his claim to the overlordship of Scotland. In 1320, the Scottish nobility submitted the Declaration of Arbroath to Pope John XXII, declaring Robert as their rightful monarch and asserting Scotland's status as an independent kingdom. 

In 1324, the Pope recognised Robert I as king of an independent Scotland, and in 1326, the Franco-Scottish alliance was renewed in the Treaty of Corbeil. In 1327, the English deposed Edward II in favour of his son, Edward III, and peace was concluded between Scotland and England with the Treaty of Edinburgh–Northampton in 1328, by which Edward III renounced all claims to sovereignty over Scotland.

Robert died in June 1329. His body is buried in Dunfermline Abbey, while his heart was interred in Melrose Abbey and his internal organs embalmed and placed in St Serf's Chapel, Dumbarton, site of the medieval Cardross Parish church.


Source: (above) Wikipedia

LINEAGE:

Robert "The Bruce" King of Scotland 1274-1329 — 20th great-grandfather

Marjorie Bruce 1297-1316 — Daughter of Robert "The Bruce" King of Scotland

Robert II Stewart King of Scotland 1316-1390 — Son of Marjorie Bruce

Margaret Stewart Princess of Scots 1342-1410 — Daughter of Robert II Stewart King of Scotland

Lord Donald MacDonald Of Islay, of the Isles & Harlaw 1359-1423 — Son of Margaret Stewart Princess of Scots

Earl Alexander MacDonald Of the Isles & Ross -1449 — Son of Lord Donald MacDonald Of Islay, of the Isles & Harlaw

Hugh MacDonald 1st of Sleat -1498 — Son of Earl Alexander MacDonald Of the Isles & Ross

Donald Gallach MacDonald 3rd of Sleat -1506 — Son of Hugh MacDonald 1st of Sleat

Donald Grumach MacDonald 4th Baron of Sleat 1480-1534 — Son of Donald Gallach MacDonald 3rd of Sleat

Donald Gorm MacDonald 5th of Sleat 1500-1539 — Son of Donald Grumach MacDonald 4th Baron of Sleat

Donald Gormson MacDonald Of Sleat 1522-1575 — Son of Donald Gorm MacDonald 5th of Sleat

Archibald Cleirich Macdonald of Sleat 1552-1617 — Son of Donald Gormson MacDonald Of Sleat

Sir Donald Gorm Og MacDonald 1st Baronet of Sleat 1575-1643 — Son of Archibald Cleirich Macdonald of Sleat

Donald MacDonald 1st of Castleton 1624-1690 — Son of Sir Donald Gorm Og MacDonald 1st Baronet of Sleat

John MacDonald 2nd of castleton 1661-1755 — Son of Donald MacDonald 1st of Castleton

Donald MacDonald 3rd of Castleton 1712-1768 — Son of John MacDonald 2nd of castleton

John McDonald 1739-1826 — Son of Donald MacDonald 3rd of Castleton

John McDonald II 1775-1826 — Son of John McDonald

Angus McDonald 1810-1887 — Son of John McDonald II

Margaret McDonald 1832-1881 — Daughter of Angus McDonald

Allen McNeill 1865-1927 — Son of Margaret McDonald

Annie Margaret McNeill 1892-1964 — Daughter of Allen McNeill — grandmother


UPDATE...


Robert's ancestors came to Great Britain from Normandy, France with William the Conqueror in 1066


LINEAGE:


Robert de Brusse (came to England with William the Conqueror in 1066) 1036-1094 -- 29th great-grandfather




Adam de Brus -1094-- Son of Robert de Brusse

Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale 1070-1141 -- Son of Adam de Brus




Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale 1138-1194 -- Son of Robert de Brus 1st Lord of Annandale




William de Brus 3rd Lord of Annandale -1212 -- Son of Robert de Brus 2nd Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale 1195-1226 -- Son of William de Brus 3rd Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale 1215-1295 -- Son of Robert de Brus 4th Lord of Annandale




Robert de Brus 6th Lord of Annandale 1243-1304 -- Son of Robert de Brus 5th Lord of Annandale




Robert I "The Bruce" King of Scotland 1274-1329 -- Son of Robert de Brus 6th Lord of Annandale